Arrival

Thanks to my coworker and friend, Ed Summerfield I’ve taken the leap to create my own blog. It could be perhaps because everyone on my spam list is tired of links of ‘hey, this is cool, check it out’!

My interest is in developing for the web – I’ve been doing most of my work with asp.net from the days of early beta. I’ve seen it come along and I’ve ridden with it through some ups and downs. At first I took my purely Microsoft route, datasets, typed datasets – objectdatasources – 3 tier models heavy with stored procedures, etc…

I’m not one to just stop and say, ‘ok that’s it, I’m set’. I like to keep pushing. I think the best thing that has ever happened was when I joined my current employer, SDS (Strategic Data Systems) – mostly because I met other, well experienced developers. The best discussions I’ve had are with the guys that had a java background. At first I was a bit bothered how they would ‘piece together’ a solution. At least that is how I initially viewed it. Now I see it differently. I think the first conversation was with my good friend Dave (Wanner) and Ping (Cui). Great guys on a gig in Dayton we were on. First Dave was pushing NUnit and testing on me, and Ping started by asking me about Spring.NET and Martin Fowler. I was immediately seeking out to understand more of this, in particular the whole concept of Inversion of Control.

One thing leads to another and I’m looking at Castle! If you develop in .NET you should really look at what Castle offers. It’s not just one solution, it’s a whole collection. Monorail, ActiveRecord, Windsor, etc…

Jimmy Nilsson’s book ‘Applying Domain-Driven Design and Patterns’ was a good jump start for me, both in terms of grasping what TDD is, and also about tools such as NHibernate. At first I looked for ways to ‘generate’ my NHibernate classes, etc… but then I found myself really wanting to understand the technology.

That all being said, my current project has given me a great opportunity to really work with these tools I love. My buddy Ravi can attest as I end a day saying ‘Man I love this stuff’! It’s a joy to code and build things in a way that is both challenging and fun.

I’m using an architecture that using NHibernate as the Domain, Windsor IoC container to handle the DAO/IRepository layers, and a good MVP design for the UI (I would have pushed for Monorail, but we have others not ready yet- and a strong desire to use the Telerik controls – but, I’m still figuring how to use it with anyway!). Billy McCafferty gave me the leap start I really needed in his article NHibernate Best Practices with ASP.NET, 1.2nd Ed.
Much more could be said, hence the blog. We’ll see how it goes – I don’t consider myself much of a writer. I prefer to be investigating technologies, but I have learned a ton from guys like Ayende, Jeremy Miller (his post on Orthogonal Code is a classic as far as I’m concerned – lol), etc… so perhaps I can pass something along to help someone else out while on my journey!

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7 thoughts on “Arrival

  1. Congratulations on the blog. Another to add to my blogroll.

    You always seem to find interesting things. Now I can inject them via RSS.

  2. There may be a problem with your comments.

    1) You should enable filtering of all of them before they are added to your blog since you will get lots of spam.

    2) This will be my fourth comment and see a random number of them displayed.

    3) I still see “No Comments” on the main page.

  3. I finally figured it out Ed – my email was treating these notifications as spam and I didn’t notice that, so none of them were getting approved.

    We should start seeing comments now 🙂

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